January 9, 2010

Essential social media connections for your blog

circuits
Photo by WhatKnot

This is day 6 of the 31 Day Challenge To Optimize Your Blog With Social Media. Today we’ll start digging in laying down the social media cable in your blog.

John HaydonThe main goal with your blog is to be a platform for connection: your readers connecting with you, connecting with each other, and connecting with your social media outposts.

In terms of your social media sites, you want to keep two things in mind:

  • Let folks connect with you on their terms. There’s no way to tell if your visitor is a YouTube fanatic, a Twitter fanatic or a Facebook fanatic. Let them self-identify by giving them all choices.
  • Take away as many barriers as possible. Give them many choices in multiple places and make those choices actionable with one click. Don’t make them search for your org on Facebook if they were just on your site.

Essential social media connections from your blog

The sidebar

Listing social media sites in the sidebar is a common practice. Most blog themes make it easy to include those links with images. You can also create linked images with HTML.

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August 10, 2009

How to automatically feed your blog posts into Facebook

A video tutorial that takes ‘manual’ out of the process

John HaydonI recently spoke with a non-profit client who I’m working with on social web strategies. At the end of our call, she complained “We’ve been so busy recently. I can barely remember to paste our blog posts onto our Facebook Page.”

When I told her that she could automate the feed, she almost jumped through the phone with joy. I promised her that I’d make this video.

If you don’t have a Facebook Page yet, go watch How to create a Facebook Page in less than four minutes. I’ll wait right here.

This tutorial on how to import your blog posts into your Facebook Page covers the following steps:

  • Adding the notes application to your Facebook Page
  • Adding your blog’s RSS feed to the application
  • Confirming and importing your blog posts

Did I miss anything? Add a comment below.

June 11, 2009

A public RSS reader for you!

Amy Sample WardWhen it comes to nptech, or nonprofit technology, there are more blogs and organizations and resources than any one person can find, let alone keep track of!  I’m no exception.  I’m overwhelmed daily, just like everyone else, by the amount of information that’s available from, for and about our sector of technology and social benefit. 

So, my response is simple: I want to share my RSS reader with you. What’s in my brain can be in yours!

Amy Sample Ward’s Version of RSS

aswrss

Why?

This is just a starting place. There are other places you can go to find more blogs and resources as well, like Alltop and even WeAreMedia. So, why did I do this? I want to help support those just starting to investigate the options of social technologies for social change work, as well as give something back to those already invested and contributing to the community. Opening up my RSS reader (well, except for my mom’s blog and that kind of thing!) is something I have wanted to do for a while because it

  1. provides an opportunity for me to offer a bit of value back to the larger tech+change community that is so valuable to me
  2. is aligned with my core values of collaboration and sharing
  3. creates a chance to improve this collection of feeds by and with my community

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May 9, 2009

Seven blogging tools reviewed

A detailed look at the top blogging software platforms

Target audience: Nonprofits, cause organizations, businesses, individuals

Guest post by TechSoup

While often regarded as a platform for people to share their personal stories, a blog can also be used to tell the story of an organization. Whether showcasing your work, offering behind-the-scenes glimpse into your nonprofit, highlighting the people you serve, or advocating a particular point of view, a blog can be a powerful — and influential — communication and public-relations tool for your organization.

So how do you create a blog? Let’s say that you’ve already spent time reading other blogs and articles on how to successfully maintain and promote your blog. (More Resources at the end of this article will help you get started.) You’ve defined your goals, your target audience, and the type of content you’ll provide. Your next challenge is to pick the blogging tool that offers the right features for you.

There are a number of good blogging tools, but choosing among them can be confusing. In this report, we’ll take a detailed look at the top blogging tools out there and outline key considerations for selecting a blogging platform, including the skills required to set it up; the ease with which you can post to it; whether you can upload images, video, or audio to it; its ability to moderate comments and prevent spam; how closely you can tailor its design to match the look and feel of your organization’s Web site and other collateral; and tools you can use to track who’s reading it.

The seven blogging platforms we’ve chosen to review are Blogger, LiveJournal, Typepad, Movable Type, WordPress, ExpressionEngine, and TextPattern. We chose these tools because they are the ones most commonly used to create a typical nonprofit blog — by a long shot. 77 percent of all the bloggers included in the Nonprofit Blog Exchange and 81 percent of respondents in a survey of serious bloggers conducted by ProBlogger used one of these seven tools.

That said, these seven tools certainly don’t meet all possible needs. This report doesn’t include the more sophisticated tools you might use to build a complex multi-blogger community, or blogging software that provides deep Web site integration. You’ll want to look beyond this report if you need a posting workflow, where, for instance, an editor can approve posts from many different blog authors; a closed community in which only specific people can see, post, and comment; complex integration with other Web site content such as forums; or if you’re building a Web site that includes a blog built from scratch. For example, Drupal and Joomla! — both free, open source, content management systems — were among the top ten tools most commonly used blogging tools in the Blog Market Analysis. These tools, and a number of other powerful and sophisticated blog and community tools, are well worth a look if your blogging needs are more complex

But for the rest of us — whether we’re with a big nonprofit that wants a highly branded, tailored blog with multiple authors, or a tiny organization looking for something easy to set up and use — one of the seven tools covered here will work just fine. We’ll help you ask the right questions to determine which blog is right for your organization and provide reviews of the most popular nonprofit blogging platforms.

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March 31, 2009

WordPress and TypePad compared

Both services are versatile, but WP has pulled ahead

Matt Mullenweg, CC photo by Robert Scoble

Matt Mullenweg, CC photo by Robert Scoble

JD LasicaPeople still ask us all the time which blogging platform they should use. (Micro-answer: It depends on what’s important to you.) During the first few months of 2009, we decided to launch two new ventures — Socialmedia.biz and Socialbrite.org — on WordPress.org platform. Let me explain why.

I’ve been blogging since May 2001, first at Dave Winer’s Manila platform and since 2003 on Six Apart’s TypePad. I was content for a long while, but over the past couple of years a revolution was brewing at WordPress — and finally reached the point where I could no longer ignore its pull. In WordPress.org, Matt Mullenweg (pictured above) offered a free, open source platform that thousands of developers were coding for. (We opted for self-hosting rather than the hosted wordpress.com version.) Somewhere between 2007 and 2008, WP became not only comparable to TypePad, but better. Not because of Matt’s coding prowess, but because of the power of crowdsourced development. I now find myself attending WordPress Camps, alongside BarCamps, Social Media Camps and other open media efforts born of my involvement with Ourmedia.org.

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