September 27, 2011

Facebook nuked the ‘Like’ button, now what?

like button
Image by Jan Kowalski on Bigstock

Target audience: Nonprofits, NGOs, cause organizations, social enterprises, brands, social media managers, individuals

John HaydonUp until last week, the only people who could comment on or like content on a Facebook Page were fans of that Page. Now, Facebook has eliminated that requirement, allowing anyone (fans and non-fans) the ability to engage with a Facebook Page.

The result of this change is that the importance of “liking” Pages has essentially been nuked – for both brands and for Facebook users.

Remain calm, here’s what it means

remain calm

Understandably, you are freaking out. But you’re also excited about this change!

You’re freaking out …

Because you’re worried about how to control conversations about your nonprofit. It’s like moderating Twitter without the ability to search. So you’re freaking out.

You’re also freaking out because maybe you were over-focused on accumulating fans in the first place. And were shocked to learn that getting a new fan doesn’t mean you’ve earned a spot in their news feed. So you’re freaking out.

But you’re excited …

Because this means that your Page updates could receive exponential attention. With the hurdle of “liking” a page removed, more people will engage with your Page stories!

You’re excited because for you it was always about engagement. It was never just a numbers game.

So what does this mean for Page administrators?

  • Be interesting. Because Pages are now more open, it’s even more important that you have a content strategy that keeps people interested.
  • Listen. Because conversations about your nonprofit are harder to monitor, it means taking another look at using tools like Social Mentionto keep track of what people are saying.
  • Evolve. Stop posting updates just to boost your Edgerank, and start creating deeper and broader discussions with Facebook users.

The good news

The good news is that the majority of communication and marketing professionals are too lazy and uninterested in having real discussions with their fans. So if you have a sincere commitment to do this, the competition will be few.

What do you think?

September 26, 2011

7 ways Facebook’s Subscribe button can be a nonprofit game-changer

Facebook subscribers

Target audience: Nonprofits, NGOs, cause organizations, social enterprises, brands, social media managers, individuals

John HaydonUp until now there has been no way for the leaders within your nonprofit to join discussions about your cause on Facebook, unless they were willing to compromise their privacy. But now with the Subscribe Button, Facebook users can opt in to their public updates without being a friend.

Multiply the No. of organizational touch points on Facebook

1The Facebook experience is essentially a personal one. If given the choice, your fans would rather connect with the people they already know and respect in your organization.

One way to give them what they want is to select a handful of these respected employees to be spokespeople for your cause on Facebook. Once you’ve selected these folks, you can add them as featured admins on your Facebook Page displayed in the left-hand sidebar (see below).
admin panel

You could also create a custom tab called “Our People” with a two-sentence bio for each spokesperson and a link to their Profile.

Enhance relationships with your Facebook fans

2One way to think about the strategy mentioned in #2 is to remember that your brand is ultimately your people. They’re your brand at events, and on the telephone. So why wouldn’t they be your brand on Facebook?

By putting multiple spokespeople on the Facebook front lines, you’re giving your supporters more human ways to connect with your organization. Quantity and quality.

Segment communication channels

3It gets really interesting if you have leaders within specific focus areas. For example, UNICEF might promote spokespeople based on the countries they serve. This way, a donor who consistently supports the organization in Ghana can subscribe to updates from that UNICEF spokesperson. Continue reading