September 30, 2009

8 ways to use social media in the newsroom

8 ways screenshot

JD LasicaFor the annual conference of the Online News Association this weekend, I’ve pulled together two new printable handouts: 8 ways to use social media in the newsroom, available at http://bit.ly/social-flyer, and 6 Twitter tools for journalists (PDF — and see the accompanying post). I’m speaking on the aptly named Social Media Mania panel on Saturday.

I think these are two of the nicer handouts I’ve produced, using Apple Pages, part of the iWork suite. These downloadable documents are part of the ongoing series of social media guides and tutorials that Socialbrite has been producing for social change organizations, nonprofits, journalists and anyone interested in effective use of social media.

While the PDFs are spiffy-looking, they’re less than optimal for search engines and for the disabled, so I’ll mirror the handouts here in html.

8 ways to use social media in the newsroom

FriendFeed

1An uber-aggregator of your feeds, FriendFeed is like Twitter but easier to organize. You can post more than 140 characters, organize private or public rooms and get a feed of your friends as an e-mail. But FriendFeed is more than an aggregation tool: It’s a virtual watering hole where you can see what’s on the mind of your friends and colleagues.

Search the real-time Web

2Find out what people are talking about online right now — chances are you can turn a meme into a story. Tools include Twitter Search, Tweetmeme, OneRiot, Scoopler.

Flip out!

flip3We’re all multimedia journalists now, right? Never let another eye-catching moment or newsworthy subject slip by: A Flip cam ($199 for hi-def version) lets you easily add a visual element to a story. Users are more likely to jump into a conversation around a video on your site than a text-only article. Kodak’s Zi8 is also a good choice. Continue reading

September 30, 2009

GoingGreen: Innovations in green tech

closeup
Photo by Salem Kimble

By Salem Kimble
East Bay Green Tours

Earlier this month, amid the picturesque backdrop of the Cavallo Lodge in Sausalito, Calif., a flurry of venture capitalists and industry innovators came together at the GoingGreen Conference from AlwaysOn. There were all manner of industries represented, from cement that absorbs carbon (Novacem) to low frequency wireless technology for long range monitoring (On-Ramp Wireless) to completely architected materials (Nanosys) and everything in between.

In fact, there was so much going on, let’s break down a few of the more intriguing elements.

Smart designs for buildings

Project Frog, a slick and friendly outfit from San Francisco, showed off their super quick building construction from partially pre-fabricated buildings that minimize waste during construction, save 50 percent in energy once built, and go up in an incredible six weeks’ time. Their smart designs take into consideration the building process and include things like designing doors and walls to fit the size that the wall material is when sold. Their flagship installation is at Crissy Field in San Francisco.

Buildings are important, but perhaps more intriguing are the people who are re-engineering the building blocks themselves, as Novacem has done. They have an alternative to Portland cement (standard material used in the majority of construction) that has a lighter carbon footprint at the outset and over the long term. Says Novacem’s Stewart Evans, “The big win is that Novacem has the potential to not only remove the 5 percent [of carbon] from creation [of the cement] but to take out 4 percent of carbon [from the atmosphere] over time.” Continue reading

September 30, 2009

16 big ideas to change the world: Vote now

Google to award $10 million in Project 10^100 Prize

Sloane BerrentVoting is open now through Oct. 8 for who you think should win Google’s Project 10^100 Prize.

Google, which launched the program a year ago on its 10th birthday, has committed to awarding $10 million in prizes. Since last year, more than 150,000 idea submissions in 25 languages have poured in. More than 3,000 Google employees have grouped the submissions into 16 overall themes, and now they’ve turned to crowdsourcing, asking you to vote to vote for the most worthy themes. The project’s advisory board will then settle on five projects, Google will ask companies or organizations to submit a request for proposal, and those who impress the board will receive the money.

Here are the categories:

  • Community: How can we help connect people, build communities and protect unique cultures?
  • Opportunity: How can we help people better provide for themselves and their families?
  • Energy: How can we help move the world toward safe, clean, inexpensive energy?
  • Environment: How can we help promote a cleaner and more sustainable global ecosystem?
  • Health: How can we help individuals lead longer, healthier lives?
  • Education: How can we help more people get more access to better education?
  • Shelter: How can we help ensure that everyone has a safe place to live?
  • Everything else: Sometimes the best ideas don’t fit into any category at all.

Continue reading

September 29, 2009

YouTube amps up its Call To Action feature

John HaydonYour organization has included YouTube content as part of your social media marketing plan. You’ve signed up for the Youtube non-profit program so that you can use external links to allow fans to make donations, sign up as volunteers or sign a petition (regular users can link only to other YouTube videos).

I wrote about the “Call To Action” layover feature back in July, but it now appears that YouTube has amped up the feature. It now includes:

1. Prettier links

prettier links Continue reading

September 29, 2009

YouthNoise: Helping young people network a cause

YouthNoise: Helping youths collaborate on causes from JD Lasica on Vimeo.

JD LasicaI‘ve long admired the folks behind YouthNoise, the global social network for social good developed for and by young people around the world. Based in San Francisco, YouthNoise offers a community dedicated to creating lasting positive change around the world, with the resources to build campaigns, amplify projects and kick off grassroots movements. The site offers a wide variety of tools, Web and mobile technologies and peer support that let members turn ideas into action in areas ranging from health to human rights, from education and the environment to poverty.

Think of it as a Change.org for young people, but with a somewhat deeper set of collaboration tools.

Above is an 8-minute interview with Ginger Thomson, who recently stepped down as CEO to take on an advisory role to cement a partnership between LinkTV and YouthNoise, among other things. Ginger has long been a leading figure in empowering Generation Y with the Web 2.0 and social media tools to advance social causes.

With traditional volunteer organizations constrained these days, Thomson says, the tendency of young people to take a do-it-yourself approach to volunteerism may prove especially fruitful, with youths diving in and raising money for the causes they believe in. “This is the DIY Generation,” she says, and young people today have become more entrepreneuria. While traditional volunteerism among Gen Y may have declined, many young people are creating projects around causes that they feel passionate about — with the help of YouthNoise and other sites.

“Alongside the DIY element they also want to bring their friends in, so that everybody’s doing things together,” Ginger says. The YouthNoise site contains social networking capabilities, fundraising tools and access to resources. See the site’s Toolkit Hall of Fame and its Raise It and Donate It Toolkit. Continue reading

September 28, 2009

Social media for social action

social-media

And a day of workshops devoted to blogging best practices

JD LasicaI‘ll be among the trainers on hand on Oct. 23 for Social Media for Social Action, a day of training and workshops geared especially for Oakland nonprofits and community organizations.

Interested in blogging, Twitter, Facebook & other social media tools for your organization, but not sure how to measure results, plan a campaign, or whether you have the time? Start here: Join us for a day of high-quality, low-cost workshops tailored to your needs.

Look for a full day of workshops led by a team of social media and multimedia experts from Public Media Collaborative, Spot.us, Oakland Local, Socialbrite.org, The Center for IndyMedia and Newsdesk.org.

When: Oct. 23 (a Friday), all day

Where: Tech Liminal, 268 14th St., Oakland (510) 832-3401

Cost: $10; no one turned away for lack of funds

Register: On Eventbrite or purchase your ticket on the Techliminal site

Volunteer: [email protected]

East Bay blogging workshop

The following day, it’s the Return of East Bay Bloggers.

Get together with other East Bay bloggers for a day of workshops, meetups and talk. Learn hands-on skills with multimedia, talk about growing your community, and ponder making money. Join us in knitting our communities together and celebrating individual voices in the East Bay! Continue reading