September 17, 2012

4 QR code tools that will make you love QR codes

Promote a contest, URL, etc. with Kaywa, Scan & more

Target audience: Nonprofits, cause organizations, foundations, NGOs, social enterprises, businesses, marketers, educators, technologists, Web publishers.

John HaydonRock The Vote recently launched their Scan To Vote campaign to register 1.5 million voters using T-shirts printed with QR codes. When someone scans the QR code on their friend’s T-shirt, they are directed to a website where they can register to vote.

Joe Waters has already written a few times about how organizations are using QR codes to raise more money, covering things like how to create a QR code, how to create a mobile site with Google Sites and how to promote the offer.

Once you get grounded with QR, here are four tools I think you’ll find valuable to help you get started with QR codes:

Kaywa: The easiest way to create a QR code

1Kaywa allows you to create customized QR codes that can link to a URL, text, phone number, or SMS. Their paid service includes analytics.

To create a QR code with Kaywa, simply enter your URL, text, phone number, or SMS; click generate; and then copy the code or save the image (as shown below). Continue reading

July 18, 2009

Good.ly: a tiny url service for charity

Good.ly: a url shortener to benefit charity from JD Lasica on Vimeo.

JD LasicaDuring the Traveling Geeks‘ visit to London last week, I twice met Alicia Navarro, founder and CEO of Slimlinks, an automated affiliate marketing service for blogs and websites. During our talk she mentioned a little-known service that deserves wider visibility: good.ly.

goodlyIn this one-minute video, Alicia describes how it works. If you’re going to make a product recommendation on Twitter, you can do it through one of the traditional url shorteners — bit.ly, is.gd, ow.ly — or you can use good.ly. At good.ly you can designate a charity will would benefit from any commissions that are generated by your recommendation.

ChildVoice International, Crisis and DogsTrust are among the charities that would earn the lion’s share of commissions generated by a tweet.

Watch or embed the video on Vimeo

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